Archive for Home Insurance

Three Pigs Convicted Of Insurance Fraud

The Guardian is reporting that the verdict is in at the trial of the three pigs on Insurance fraud.

The pigs have been found guilty of attempting to defraud an unnamed UK household  insurance company out of thousands of pounds and bearing false witness and committing perjury in the recent trial of Mr Wolf, who the pigs had been telling porky pies about. The pigs lies were sniffed out when claims farmers smelt a rat. The rat later confessed to fixing the insurance sting for the pigs.

Justice Fox described the pigs defence as ‘ham’.  He said “Pigs who make false claims put up the cost of insurance for all of us. The pigs will be sentenced at a later date. Insurance Blog hopes they fry!

Follow the best non-insurance insurance story this year at http://www.guardian.co.uk

Business Insurance Guide

New to Insurance? Just Started a business?

Whether you are self employed, a sole trader, run a small business or enterprise or are a director of a large company, you will need to understand the scope and limitations of Business Insurance policies.

Our Guide to Business Insurance explains all from the top down!

If you have just started a new enterprise or have been asked to look after the company’s insurance renewals, business insurance can at first seem a daunting proposition. After all, much of the language and industry jargon such as endorsements, indemnity levels and excess periods can at first appear alien.

Then there is the question of knowing what covers to get.

With the responsibility of ensuring that the business activities and property are completely covered from risks that the firm might face, a new small businessman may well also be confused by the plethora of covers, plans and policies that are available today.

Business insurance is however fairly simple even for newbies, if you break it down from the top.

There are basically two types of risk that a business may face in daily operations, these being business property risks and business liability risks.

All business insurance policies contain elements of the two risks either separate or combined under a single plan. If you need cover for business buildings and premises contents, you will need property insurance. If you need cover for the work you do, you will require liability insurance. Most businesses need elements of both.

Business property buildings insurance protects all risks to a business premises covering loss,material damage and consequential loss to all buildings, outbuildings, fixtures and fittings on the premises.

The premiums are calculated on rebuilding costs of the business property and will also contain elements of public liability to protect a business against claims from the public of for example, a wall falling on a passer-by.

Property contents insurance covers loss or damage to the contents of the business premises. Business contents policies typically have provision to cover items such as furniture, tables and desks, computer equipment, telecommunications equipment, business electronic equipment, data, tools, machinery, stock, high risk stock, raw materials, fabricated, assembled, manufactured or stored goods and anything used in the daily operation on the business premises.

Freight, cargo and goods in transit cover options provide insurance for the businesses property away from the premises.

Business property insurance polices are typically marketed by the type business property they provide insurance for. For example office insurance, shop insurance, hotel insurance and pub insurance are popular commercial property insurance schemes which contain all the relevant covers for each use of the property type.

Much business property is either rented or leased, in particular offices and shop space. Business insurance provides specialist cover for property owners of these types of premises with a let property insurance policy, which is tailor-made for business landlords.

Business Liability Insurance protects a business against all liabilities that the enterprise might be liable for as it carries out its daily actions. Liabilities are events which occur that could lead to claims against the proprietor, trader, owner, partnership or company. Liability insurance cover protects the company profits against all damages and costs incurred resulting from the claim.

Business Liability Insurance includes Public Liability Insurance, Employers Liability, Products Liability, Directors and Company Officers Liability and Professional Indemnity Insurance.

Public Liability protects the business profits against claims from members of the public and this cover forms the basis of a standard business insurance contract.

If you employ staff you will require by law Employers liability insurance which protects your business against claims resulting from accidents and injuries to paid employees and sub contractors whilst anywhere at work.

If you sell or provide goods or parts your business will need Products liability insurance.This cover is usually automatically included in for example, a shop insurance policy.

Nearly all business insurance polices sold, in particular those online, are what is known as combined business insurance or trade packages that have been specifically designed for particular trades or professions. Find one that allows you to compare business insurance quotes and that is suitable for your particular company by carrying out a search for your trade, service or profession insurance. These combined business insurance policies contain all the covers you will need in your line of work, ensuring that if a claim against your company is made, you will be covered.

The company owners or directors can also purchase Directors & Officers Insurance or D & O insurance as it is often called, which covers them personally against both civil and criminal liabilities resulting from business activities.

Additionally professional services should purchase Professional Indemnity insurance which covers the service against the liability of any advice that might be given professionally and later turns out to be negligent.

Business Insurance quotes from top brands and providers, offering the cheapest prices and excellent cover, only take a minute to compare at leading business and commercial insurance comparison site UK Commercial Insurance.

Originally published By Insurance Blog at http://EzineArticles.com/?Business-Insurance-Explained&id=6940667

Shop Insurance: Cover for a Nation of Shopkeepers

In the middle of the eighteenth century, the great father of modern Economics, Scot Adam Smith declared that the future of the UK economy lay with free trade and the ability to sell and provide goods and services.

Half a century later a certain vertically challenged Corsican upstart disparagingly called us a nation of Shopkeepers. Two hundred years later to the day, shopping is essential to oil the wheels of the UK economy in our consumer society and shops are ubiquitous business enterprises.

Shops present distinct risks to an Insurer and over the years policies have developed that reflect the liability and property needs of a twenty first century retail outlet. We asked insuranceblogger to investigate what constitutes a shop insurance packaged policy.

A Guide To Shop Insurance Covers

By Insurance Blogger

Owning and running a shop can be hard enough work in itself, often seven days a week, without the additional worry of what might happen to your livelihood should the worst happen. Fortunately there are many different shop insurance policies available today covering all the risks that a retailer might face in running a business from a premises that sells goods and services to the public.

A shop insurance policy will contain a variety of covers, packaged up for the convenience of the shopkeeper.

These include shop buildings and contents cover, stock in trade cover, business interruption and loss of profits, money cover and staff fidelity insurance, legal protection, window & glass cover for shop fronts, goods in transit, public liability, employers liability, and various options to cover shop specific risks. Shop insurance packages will include as standard most of the above risks, whilst some insurers allow the prospective policyholder to select the covers that are appropriate for their particular type of shop.

Shop Insurers use various basic rating factors to decide premiums and postcode and annual turnover are major factors.

The location of your shop will largely determine the price you pay for cover, in particular for shop stock and contents. A shop located in a run down housing estate with known propensity for theft and vandalism will command a much higher premium than one located in a modern shopping centre with street security and CCTV. Annual turnover is used to calculate cover levels such as the impact of a loss on a shops ability to trade.

Shop buildings insurance covers the costs of rebuilding the shop and the costs of replacing the shop front, which is invariably made of glass. All buildings insurance covers permanent fixtures and fittings such as toilets and doors. This cover is available for both shop owners and those who lease the property.

Shop contents insurance covers all the additional shop fittings and equipment that is used in the daily running of the business. Most insurance companies will require a breakdown of the contents of the shop into sums insured fo business equipment, fixtures and fittings, electrical and computer equipment, tenants improvements, refrigerated stock and all other stock.

Shops that require protection for high risk goods held on the premises will usually need to declare the total values of each stock item. High risk shop stock and goods are those that attract thieves and are expensive to replace. Examples of high risk stock items are electronic equipment, cigarettes, and tobacco, designer clothing, computers and digital equipment, software, computer games and consoles, drugs pharmacy and medicines, watches and jewellery, mobile phones and radios, photographic equipment, power tools, TVs, DVDs, CDs and Wines and Spirits.

If your shop has high risk stock you can reduce the cost of your premiums by having adequate security in place. This includes an insurance company approved burglar and fire alarm, window grills, shutters and bars, CCTV and sprinklers. Many shop insurers will only offer stock cover if the minimum levels of security are in place for all shops, regardless of the stock contents held. A lot of insurers may offer further large discounts to the premium if the shop owner lives on or above the premises and is there at night.

Shops by their very nature deal with members of the public and a good insurance policy will usually contain liability cover as standard. This should include Public Liability of up to £2,000,000 for any one claim by a member of the public who may suffer loss or injury visiting the shop.

If you employ staff all policies will offer Employers Liability cover of up to £10,000,000 one event and because shops sell goods and services, Products Liability cover of £2,000,000 for any one period of insurance.

Other standard features of a shop insurance policy are various levels of cover for Legal expenses and Legal protection, Employers, Public and Products Liability, Loss of profits, Glass and Sanitary Ware, Money cover and staff Personal Accident assault, Business Interruption, Goods in Transit, Loss of Licence, Treatment Risks and Seasonal increases in stock contents value.

Shop Insurance is available to buy online from a variety of mainstream and independent suppliers, many of who offer policies for specialist niche shops and retail outlets. Shopping around for cover is easy and many brokers now offer shop insurance comparsion systems where you can compare shop insurance quotes and covers online.

Ensure you read the keyfacts documents of any policies offered, so you are aware of the levels of cover offered before you buy.

Could Flooding Become A Fundamental Risk in The UK?

For those UK underwriters and loss adjusters watching the scenes of devastation caused by hurricane Irene and particularly flooding in states like Vermont, they will be glad that their insurance company does not have to pick up the bill.

They needn’t have worried though because in the United States Flood Risk is considered fundamental and cannot be covevered under a normal home insurance policy as such…as yet!

In fact all home insurance flood risks are the responsibility of each State to provide under a national scheme. In the United States, uniquely in the developed world, insuring houses against flood damage is the sole province of the federal government.

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), was created in 1968 by Congress and is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, is virtually the only place to get protection against the ever increasing disasters of flood and storm surge.

From an insurance point of view the program is the same as any other private-sector insurance program.

You pay the government a certain amount and when a flood happens, receive coverage for repairs and losses.

As of June 30, the program had nearly 5.6 million policies in force with a total insured value of $1.246 trillion. But from a fiscal standpoint FEMA does not manage the NFIP like a traditional insurer.

Most insurers use a measure of solvency that looks at their capital and reserves and their ability to pay claims. In particular, regulators require insurance companies to keep a statutory reserve of liquid assets to cover potential future losses. FEMA, on the other hand, has said it manages the NFIP to generate enough premiums to cover expenses and losses for an average loss year, rather than keeping capital for the long term.

In other words it does not keep enough reserves! And guess what? It’s run out of money!

Apparantely former agency officials admit it charges rates that dramatically underprice the risks faced. That is all well and good in a normal year and when business is good, but when a worse-than-average loss year happens, the consequences are disastrous.

Folowing the disatrous hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, the NFIP was more or less insolvent, without the capacity to pay the huge volume of claims those hurricanes created. Congress reacted by increasing the NFIP’s borrowing ability from the U.S. Treasury more than 13-fold, to a level of nearly $21 billion. That debt burden is, by all accounts, unsustainable.

While Irene was no Katrina, it comes on top of serious Midwestern flooding that the program has already had to deal with this year. Some people believe NFIP will stretch its debt boundaries and may well end up needing more assistance. “It may be a little bit too soon to tell but it’s certainly not going to be a very good year for the NFIP and we’ve not finished the year yet,” said Robert Hartwig, an economist and the president of the Insurance Information Institute (III).

Hartwig said a private insurance market for flood coverage is absolutely possible, with plenty of insurers and reinsurers willing to get into the business – but only if the NFIP raises its rates and if insurers get assurances from state regulators that they will be able to do the same.

Insurance Blog wonders if given all the recent flood claims in the UK due to climate change and the pressure to build houses on floodplains, whether Flood Insurance will at some point become a fundamental risk in the UK for some homes?

The UK Government would be well advised to consult with construction companies, environmental scientists, climatologists, pressure groups and Insurance companies before we reach the crisis about to hit the US Treasury.

The solution is simple – do not solve the UK housing problem by building on floodplains or areas of geographical risk.

Home Insurance Money Saving Tips

How can you reduce your Home Insurance Costs?

When it comes to home insurance, many people simply accept the first quote that they are given without ever looking for alternatives.

However, there are several things that you can do to help reduce the cost of your building insurance and contents insurance.

Obviously, depending on where you live your home insurance is always going to cost a certain amount, but it is definitely worth taking steps to reduce your costs as much as possible.

Were your calculations accurate?

When you take out insurance, you will generally be asked how much you want to cover your home for.

For example, when you take out building insurance you will have to specify a value in case the worst should happen and your home needs to be rebuilt from scratch.

Many people are unsure about this and, as such, the figure they give is inaccurate; quite a few people could reduce their costs by making this more accurate.

Do you have good security?

Something else that affects the cost of your home insurance is how safe your property is. Simply put, the safer it is, the cheaper your policy will be. Of course, there is very little you can do to reduce the amount of crime in your area, but you can do things to secure your house. For instance, good door locks and bolts can help to improve security, as can burglar alarms, gates and even CCTV.

Did you shop around?

As mentioned above, a lot of people never shop around for their home insurance and simply stick with the same provider. Often, though, it is possible to get cheaper insurance if you shop around, or even by asking your current provider if there are any other deals they could offer you: the worst they could say is no so it’s definitely worth giving it a go.